News

New Call of Duty Installment Brings Gamers Back to World War II

One of this year’s hottest games is set to arrive at JDL. Call of Duty: WWII, the long-running series’ 15th installment, takes gamers back to Call of Duty’s World War II origins. This title focuses on events during the Normandy invasion, but also has some note-worthy special features; critics are already excited about the “zombie” mode, which allows players to fight against undead Nazis.

JDL has this title for Playstation 4. You can place your holds below.

Call of Duty: WWII (PS4)

Winter 2017 – 2018 Newsletter

Your Library, Your Way

Beginning January 1, 2018, we will be making some improvements that will transform the way you use the library and make your life so much easier.

Unlimited Renewals

We’re taking away the worry. If you borrow it, you keep it until someone else wants it and we will automatically renew it for you! Or bring it back when you are ready! The “due date” is going the way of the card catalog. Don’t know what a card catalog is? It’s like a paper search engine. Ask your librarian about them.

This will be an option no matter what type of format you have checked out: books, movies, music, etc… Old or new.

Increased Holds

Place up to 50 holds, regardless of format.

Movies, Your Way!

No more waiting before you can place a hold on a new movie. If you see it in our online catalog, you can request it. Even if a movie is so new it isn’t out yet. You will want to talk to our staff about ways you can receive alerts so you know what’s coming weeks in advance.

Keep Movies Longer

All DVDs will check out for 7 days. No more 2-day checkouts, regardless of how popular or new the movie is. It will still be possible to drop by a branch and see what’s new because a browsing selection of Hot Picks movies will be available. These are the only items not available for holds and they cannot be renewed, which means there will always be something new to catch when you visit your local branch.

Enter the 2018 Young Poets Contest

Young Poets

The Jackson District Library is pleased to announce the fourteenth annual, “Poets Among Us: Young Poets Contest 2018.” With over 11,000 student entries during the first thirteen years, this event has proven to be very successful with students, teachers and parents. Over the years, entries have been received from entire classrooms, as well as students participating on their own who have a love of poetry. Poems have covered subjects as diverse as animals, divorce, hard times, family fun, friendships, sunsets, and war, to name just a few. I would like to thank you for your past support and encourage your participation in this year’s program.

The contest is open to all students in grades Kindergarten through 12 and all home-schooled students in Jackson County. Included in the attached information is a list of websites for teachers and descriptions of various types of poetry. This packet also contains the necessary materials and forms to allow teachers to incorporate the contest into their schedules including the Student Rules and Registration Form to be completed by each student. (One form must accompany each poem submitted.) Please note that entries must be submitted online or postmarked by January 26, 2018. To submit a poem online, fill out the form on this page.

Every poem is a possible winner, and the members of our Poetry Panel will enjoy reading all the poems they judge.

The contest packet contains the necessary materials and forms to allow teachers to incorporate the contest into the instruction schedule and includes the Student Rules and Registration Form to be completed by each student.

The poems will become the property of the Library and will not be returned, so please be sure to retain copies of your submission. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Jean Dailey at (517) 788-4099, ext. 1308 or daileyjl@myjdl.com, between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on weekdays.
Thank you, again, for all your assistance in making the Young Poets Contest such a success. We deeply appreciate your continuing support.

Who Needs Sleep? Check Out These Three Horror Novels You Might’ve Missed

With Halloween right around the corner, many of us are combing the stacks for our next big fright. No doubt, the horror genre earned a surge of interest after the latest adaptation of Stephen King’s It was a massive box office hit. Outside of mainstream horror writers like King, though, there are many gems waiting to be found. If you’re just returning to the genre, here are a few of my favorites from the last decade.

Bird Box by Josh Malerman
Josh Malerman, a Michigan native, scored a huge hit in the horror community with Bird Box in 2014. The story follows Malorie, a single mother with two children, as she tries to survive against a force that has killed most of the world’s population. Here’s the big problem: no one who has seen this thing—whether it’s a monster, or ominous being—has survived. Malerman’s breakout novel is one of the first books in a long time to genuinely creep me out, and he does this through pure sensory deprivation. Because many characters have to remain blindfolded at all times, Malerman uses the sounds, smells, and feelings of the characters to terrify his blind audience. This is recommended if you’re in the mood for something both terrifying and totally different.

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes
Maybe you’ve read about Detroit’s emerging arts community, but it was never as twisted as writer Lauren Beukes’ version in Broken Monsters. In the Beukes’ follow-up to The Shining Girls, readers follow Detroit detective Gabriella Versado as she tracks a killer who fuses people with animals for grotesque art displays. This book is as much mystery as it is horror, which makes Broken Monsters’ 464 pages fly by.

Little Star by John Ajvide Lindqvist
Anyone who’s read or watched the film adaptations of Lindqvist’s Let the Right One In knows he’s more than capable of finding an original spin on overdone horror themes. He tackled vampires in the former title, but Lindqvist took on teenage bullying (and revenge) in his follow-up novel, Little Star. The book very much echoes Stephen King’s Carrie, only Lindqvist’s lead character is a star in an American Idol-esque singing competition and her torment comes from a digital audience. The girl’s unraveling is as disturbing as it is sad, which makes the book’s final pages doubly devastating.

Directors Ken Burns, Lynn Novick Revisit Vietnam with 10-Part Series

There are troves of books and documentaries produced on the Vietnam Era, but critics and audiences alike have discovered a fresh perspective in director Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s new documentary. The 10-part series, which was released on DVD and started airing on PBS last week, follows the U.S.’ controversial involvement through the eyes of more than 80 interviewees.

A companion book, written by historian Geoffrey C. Ward, has also been released. You can check out both titles via JDL below. The series soundtrack is available in our Hoopla music collection as well.

PBS is also asking viewers to submit their own stories from the Vietnam War. Veterans are encouraged to share their stories here.

The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War: An Intimate History by Geoffrey C. Ward

Hillary Clinton Breaks Silence on 2016 Election with What Happened

For a portion of America’s voters, the title of Hillary Clinton’s latest memoir is still a pressing question: What Happened? Though media polls and analyst predictions had essentially declared Clinton as the victor of 2016’s presidential election, the election results were a different story. While Clinton ran an outspoken campaign, the months that followed Donald Trump’s presidential victory were notoriously silent ones for Clinton, and What Happened presents her first long-form reaction since last year’s election. From qualms with Bernie Sanders to former FBI Director James Comey, to a retelling of her concession call to Donald Trump, many of Clinton’s tales have already made national news. You can check the whole thing out for yourself via JDL.

Meijer Branch Build A Better World Short Film Winners

How do we start to build a better world?

That was the question JDL’s Meijer Branch asked at the beginning of June, when they introduced their Build a Better World Short Film Contest.

Teens, ages 14 to 18, were given the task of creating a minute to a minute in a half short film that addressed this topic. Young filmmakers could be as creative as they liked, as long as all the footage was original.

Teens were also encouraged to use the free resources of the Meijer Branch Digital Studio. Filming equipment, editing software, and music recording was all available through the Digital Studio.

Entries were submitted no later than August 1, 2017.

Judging was done by the Meijer Branch Friends of the Library.

Here are the top 3 winners,

Congratulations to the winners and a big thank you to all who participated in helping JDL build a better world.

Prepare Yourself for The Solar Eclipse with These Titles

Anyone who has turned on a TV or computer this month is probably well aware of the looming solar eclipse, the United States’ first total eclipse since 1979. The event will take place Monday, Aug. 21 between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. in Jackson, according to Space.com. Though Jackson is out of the “path of totality,” meaning the disc of the moon will not completely eclipse the sun, we can expect an 80 percent eclipse around 2:25 EST.

For anyone interested in learning more about solar eclipses, we have many titles. Check out a few below.

American eclipse : a nation’s epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world
Totality [electronic resource] : eclipses of the sun.
Sun Moon Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses from Omens of Doom to Einstein and Exoplanets
Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses

Sep – Nov Chapters Newsletter

Library of Michigan Awards Funds to JDL for Project BRIDGE

We are pleased to announce the receipt of a $150,000 two-year grant from the Library of Michigan‘s LSTA (Library Services & Technology Act) Collaborative Library Services Grant Program for the development and implementation of Project BRIDGE (Building Relationships In Diverse Generational Experiences). JDL currently provides Outreach Services to homebound patrons and care centers; however, Project BRIDGE will supplement this traditional program with innovative services for citizens living independently or in residential facilities. As the first wave of “Baby Boomers” reach age 70, the importance of providing special programs for this demographic group increases.

To better serve the needs of this growing population, JDL will collaborate with our partners: disAbility Connections, Friends of the Jackson District Library, Lloyd Ganton Retirement Centers, Inc., Jackson County Department on Aging, and the Jackson Symphony Guild to develop and deliver these services. Project BRIDGE is a multi-pronged approach to serve these patrons, their families, and caregivers. Find out more about the programs Project BRIDGE offers in this season’s newsletter.

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