Tayari Jones’ An American Marriage Explores Commitment Under Duress

An American Marriage Book Cover

Tayari Jones’ An American Marriage is one of the few 2018 titles generating buzz among critics and readers alike. The novel, which is the latest installment in Oprah’s Book Club, follows two young professionals in Atlanta: Celestial and Roy. The newlyweds face a nightmare scenario when Roy is wrongfully convicted and sentenced to 12 years in prison, leaving Celestial to decide how to live her own life outside. Readers and critics have lauded Jones for the compelling premise, but also for her difficult exploration of the concepts of marriage and commitment.

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Check Out These Grammy-Winning Albums Today

The 2018 Grammys came to a close recently, with Bruno Mars and Kendrick Lamar taking home the top prizes. Whether you’re a fan of pop, rock, rap, country, or jazz, JDL has a wide selection of offerings from the 2018 Grammy winners. You can place holds on some of the winning albums below:

24K Magic by Bruno Mars
Won: Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Song of the Year (“That’s What I Like”), Best R&B Performance, Best R&B Album, Best Engineered Album (Non-Classical): 24K Magic, Bruno Mars

Damn. by Kendrick Lamar
Won: Best Rap Performance (“Humble.”), Best Rap/Sung Performance (“Loyalty.”), Best Rap Song (“Humble.”), Best Rap Album.

Know-it-All by Alessia Cara
Won: Best New Artist

Divide by Ed Sheeran
Won: Best Pop Solo Performance for “Shape of You,” Best Pop Vocal Album.

You Want it Darker by Leonard Cohen
Won: Best Rock Performance (“You Want it Darker”)

Concrete and Gold by Foo Fighters
Won: Best Rock Song (“Run”)

Sleep Well Beast by The National
Won: Best Alternative Album

From a Room: Volume 1 by Chris Stapleton
Won: Best Country Album

Dreams and Daggers by Cecile Mclorin Salvant
Won: Best Jazz Vocal Album

Chain Breaker by Zach Williams
Won: Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

Place February’s Hottest New Movies on Hold Today

It just got easier to stay up to date on JDL’s hottest DVD and Blu-ray releases. Starting this month JDL patrons may place holds on the newest movie titles, which now circulate for a full week. This means that you can place holds on your favorite new movies, even before they’re available at your branch. Additionally, there are no longer checkout limits on Weekly DVDs, Weekly Blu-rays, and Video Games. If you have any further questions about our new A/V policies, please contact Carnegie circulation department at (517) 788-4087.

Take a look at some of the titles below. You can also see all of our on-order movies.

All I See Is You

Daddy’s Home 2

Murder on the Orient Express

Same Kind of Different as Me



New Call of Duty Installment Brings Gamers Back to World War II

One of this year’s hottest games is set to arrive at JDL. Call of Duty: WWII, the long-running series’ 15th installment, takes gamers back to Call of Duty’s World War II origins. This title focuses on events during the Normandy invasion, but also has some note-worthy special features; critics are already excited about the “zombie” mode, which allows players to fight against undead Nazis.

JDL has this title for Playstation 4. You can place your holds below.

Call of Duty: WWII (PS4)

Who Needs Sleep? Check Out These Three Horror Novels You Might’ve Missed

With Halloween right around the corner, many of us are combing the stacks for our next big fright. No doubt, the horror genre earned a surge of interest after the latest adaptation of Stephen King’s It was a massive box office hit. Outside of mainstream horror writers like King, though, there are many gems waiting to be found. If you’re just returning to the genre, here are a few of my favorites from the last decade.

Bird Box by Josh Malerman
Josh Malerman, a Michigan native, scored a huge hit in the horror community with Bird Box in 2014. The story follows Malorie, a single mother with two children, as she tries to survive against a force that has killed most of the world’s population. Here’s the big problem: no one who has seen this thing—whether it’s a monster, or ominous being—has survived. Malerman’s breakout novel is one of the first books in a long time to genuinely creep me out, and he does this through pure sensory deprivation. Because many characters have to remain blindfolded at all times, Malerman uses the sounds, smells, and feelings of the characters to terrify his blind audience. This is recommended if you’re in the mood for something both terrifying and totally different.

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes
Maybe you’ve read about Detroit’s emerging arts community, but it was never as twisted as writer Lauren Beukes’ version in Broken Monsters. In the Beukes’ follow-up to The Shining Girls, readers follow Detroit detective Gabriella Versado as she tracks a killer who fuses people with animals for grotesque art displays. This book is as much mystery as it is horror, which makes Broken Monsters’ 464 pages fly by.

Little Star by John Ajvide Lindqvist
Anyone who’s read or watched the film adaptations of Lindqvist’s Let the Right One In knows he’s more than capable of finding an original spin on overdone horror themes. He tackled vampires in the former title, but Lindqvist took on teenage bullying (and revenge) in his follow-up novel, Little Star. The book very much echoes Stephen King’s Carrie, only Lindqvist’s lead character is a star in an American Idol-esque singing competition and her torment comes from a digital audience. The girl’s unraveling is as disturbing as it is sad, which makes the book’s final pages doubly devastating.

Directors Ken Burns, Lynn Novick Revisit Vietnam with 10-Part Series

There are troves of books and documentaries produced on the Vietnam Era, but critics and audiences alike have discovered a fresh perspective in director Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s new documentary. The 10-part series, which was released on DVD and started airing on PBS last week, follows the U.S.’ controversial involvement through the eyes of more than 80 interviewees.

A companion book, written by historian Geoffrey C. Ward, has also been released. You can check out both titles via JDL below. The series soundtrack is available in our Hoopla music collection as well.

PBS is also asking viewers to submit their own stories from the Vietnam War. Veterans are encouraged to share their stories here.

The Vietnam War
The Vietnam War: An Intimate History by Geoffrey C. Ward

Hillary Clinton Breaks Silence on 2016 Election with What Happened

For a portion of America’s voters, the title of Hillary Clinton’s latest memoir is still a pressing question: What Happened? Though media polls and analyst predictions had essentially declared Clinton as the victor of 2016’s presidential election, the election results were a different story. While Clinton ran an outspoken campaign, the months that followed Donald Trump’s presidential victory were notoriously silent ones for Clinton, and What Happened presents her first long-form reaction since last year’s election. From qualms with Bernie Sanders to former FBI Director James Comey, to a retelling of her concession call to Donald Trump, many of Clinton’s tales have already made national news. You can check the whole thing out for yourself via JDL.

Prepare Yourself for The Solar Eclipse with These Titles

Anyone who has turned on a TV or computer this month is probably well aware of the looming solar eclipse, the United States’ first total eclipse since 1979. The event will take place Monday, Aug. 21 between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. in Jackson, according to Though Jackson is out of the “path of totality,” meaning the disc of the moon will not completely eclipse the sun, we can expect an 80 percent eclipse around 2:25 EST.

For anyone interested in learning more about solar eclipses, we have many titles. Check out a few below.

American eclipse : a nation’s epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world
Totality [electronic resource] : eclipses of the sun.
Sun Moon Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses from Omens of Doom to Einstein and Exoplanets
Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses

Upcoming Films Reignite Interest in Two Stephen King Classics

Much of Stephen King’s work is as iconic on the screen as it is on the page. Many King fans no doubt remember terrifying scenes from the film versions of Carrie, The Shining, Cujo, Pet Sematary, and many more, but they can now add two more adaptations to that list. The Dark Tower, which stars Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey, is set to hit theaters on August 4, while the first part of the two-movie adaptation of It will be released on September 8.

Both books have seen a notable rise in interest, with The Dark Tower placing as No. 10 on Amazon’s Most Sold list last week.
You can check them both out via JDL below.

The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger


The Vanishing American Adult Examines a New Generation’s Reliance Issues

The vanishing American adult : our coming-of-age crisis–and how to rebuild a culture of self-reliance

By Benjamin E. Sasse

Published: 2017

306 pages

In recent years, the terms “millennial” and “baby boomer” put an extra emphasis on characteristics that have little to do with age. While millennials might be associated with safe spaces and emojis, there is also a new narrative surrounding young people in the workplace. As Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse argues in his new book, The Vanishing American Adult, there is an existential crisis in the American workforce that has left young American adults unequipped for life after high school:
Raised by well-meaning but overprotective parents and coddled by well-meaning but misbegotten government programs, America’s youth are ill-equipped to survive in our highly-competitive global economy.
Many of the coming-of-age rituals that have defined the American experience since the Founding: learning the value of working with your hands, leaving home to start a family, becoming economically self-reliant—are being delayed or skipped altogether. The statistics are daunting: 30% of college students drop out after the first year, and only 4 in 10 graduate. One in three 18-to-34 year-olds live with their parents.
Sasse’s book was released to widespread acclaim, but many readers suggest that his critique is too broad to span an entire generation. Either way, The Vanishing American Adult is an interesting introduction to a conversation that could last for decades.

Translate »